iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police pick people out of the crowd, then rush forward. Frightening. 

September 28th

sonofbaldwin:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

dhaarijmens:

bemusedlybespectacled:

washingtonpost:

In a post-Ferguson world, Americans increasingly doubt the notion of colorblind justice.

HOW THE FUCK DID THE PERCENTAGE GO UP FOR WHITE PEOPLE
IN WHAT UNIVERSE DOES A POLICE OFFICER SHOOTING AN UNARMED BLACK KID (AND THEN ATTEMPTING TO COVER IT UP AFTER THE FACT) CONSTITUTE EQUAL TREATMENT IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM
LIKE WHO LOOKS AT THAT AND GOES “WELL, BEFORE I THOUGHT THAT THERE WAS RACISM IN OUR JUSTICE SYSTEM, BUT THEN THIS SHIT HAPPENED AND NOW I SEE THAT IT’S PERFECTLY EQUAL”
WHAT THE FUCK

This increase can be explained by an interesting social phenomenon called ‘denial.’

They benefit from not knowing.. and from believing in myths. 

Comparing beliefs before and after Michael Brown’s murder and the surrounding revelations of racism that have sprung out of it, white people, as a demographic believe, MORE THAN EVER BEFORE, that the criminal justice system treats whites and blacks equally.That is, MORE white people believe the criminal justice system treats black equally now than they did before Michael Brown’s death.In essence, for white people, blatant systemic oppression and the murder of an unarmed young black man gives them even more reason to believe blacks are treated fairly by the system.This confirms an earlier study that said the more you tell white people that the system is inherently racist, the more they supported harsher punishments for black people: http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/08/07/3468368/study-white-people-support-harsher-criminal-laws-if-they-think-more-black-people-are-arrested/Marinate on these inhumanities for a second.

sonofbaldwin:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

dhaarijmens:

bemusedlybespectacled:

washingtonpost:

In a post-Ferguson world, Americans increasingly doubt the notion of colorblind justice.

HOW THE FUCK DID THE PERCENTAGE GO UP FOR WHITE PEOPLE

IN WHAT UNIVERSE DOES A POLICE OFFICER SHOOTING AN UNARMED BLACK KID (AND THEN ATTEMPTING TO COVER IT UP AFTER THE FACT) CONSTITUTE EQUAL TREATMENT IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

LIKE WHO LOOKS AT THAT AND GOES “WELL, BEFORE I THOUGHT THAT THERE WAS RACISM IN OUR JUSTICE SYSTEM, BUT THEN THIS SHIT HAPPENED AND NOW I SEE THAT IT’S PERFECTLY EQUAL”

WHAT THE FUCK

This increase can be explained by an interesting social phenomenon called ‘denial.’

They benefit from not knowing.. and from believing in myths. 

Comparing beliefs before and after Michael Brown’s murder and the surrounding revelations of racism that have sprung out of it, white people, as a demographic believe, MORE THAN EVER BEFORE, that the criminal justice system treats whites and blacks equally.

That is, MORE white people believe the criminal justice system treats black equally now than they did before Michael Brown’s death.

In essence, for white people, blatant systemic oppression and the murder of an unarmed young black man gives them even more reason to believe blacks are treated fairly by the system.

This confirms an earlier study that said the more you tell white people that the system is inherently racist, the more they supported harsher punishments for black people: http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/08/07/3468368/study-white-people-support-harsher-criminal-laws-if-they-think-more-black-people-are-arrested/

Marinate on these inhumanities for a second.

animatedamerican:tamorapierce:lamardeuse:johanirae:iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters are angry about these strange negotiations to release protesters. What kind of practice is this?

September 28th

When police start using terrorist hijacker tactics… WTF

Wow. The DoJ needs to come in and start that whole fucking police force all over again, from the ground up.

If people who weren’t wearing uniforms were doing this it would be criminal.  It should be criminal.  When bank robbers do this, it’s still criminal.  WHAT THE FUCK IS THE WHITE HOUSE DOING ABOUT THIS?

*swearing a blue streak*

Women aged 15-44 are more likely to be maimed or die from male violence than cancer, malaria, traffic accidents, and war combined.

thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong’s unprecedented protests & police crackdown, explained
September 29, 2014

Protest marches and vigils are fairly common in Hong Kong, but what began on Friday and escalated dramatically on Sunday is unprecedented. Mass acts of civil disobedience were met by a shocking and swift police response, which has led to clashes in the streets and popular outrage so great that analysts can only guess at what will happen next.

What’s going on in Hong Kong right now is a very big deal, and for reasons that go way beyond just this weekend’s protests. Hong Kong’s citizens are protesting to keep their promised democratic rights, which they worry — with good reason — could be taken away by the central Chinese government in Beijing. This moment is a sort of standoff between Hong Kong and China over the city’s future, a confrontation that they have been building toward for almost 20 years.

On Wednesday, student groups led peaceful marches to protest China’s new plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 election, which looked like China reneging on its promise to grant the autonomous region full democracy (see the next section for what that plan was such a big deal). Protest marches are pretty common in Hong Kong so it didn’t seem so unusual at first.

Things started escalating on Friday. Members of a protest group called Occupy Central (Central is the name of Hong Kong’s downtown district) had planned to launch a “civil disobedience” campaign on October 1, a national holiday celebrating communist China’s founding. But as the already-ongoing protesters escalated they decided to go for it now. On Friday, protesters peacefully occupied the forecourt (a courtyard-style open area in front of an office building) of Hong Kong’s city government headquarters along with other downtown areas.

The really important thing is what happened next: Hong Kong’s police cracked down with surprising force, fighting in the streets with protesters and eventually emerging with guns that, while likely filled with rubber bullets, look awfully militaristic. In response, outraged Hong Kong residents flooded into the streets to join the protesters, and on Sunday police blanketed Central with tear gas, which has been seen as a shocking and outrageous escalation. The Chinese central government issued a statement endorsing the police actions, as did Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing chief executive, a tacit signal that Beijing wishes for the protests to be cleared.

You have to remember that this is Hong Kong: an affluent and orderly place that prides itself on its civility and its freedom. Hong Kongers have a bit of a superiority complex when it comes to China, and see themselves as beyond the mainland’s authoritarianism and disorder. But there is also deep, deep anxiety that this could change, that Hong Kong could lose its special status, and this week’s events have hit on those anxieties to their core.

This began in 1997, when the United Kingdom handed over Hong Kong, one of its last imperial possessions, to the Chinese government. Hong Kong had spent over 150 years under British rule; it had become a fabulously wealthy center of commerce and had enjoyed, while not full democracy, far more freedom and democracy than the rest of China. So, as part of the handover, the Chinese government in Beijing promised to let Hong Kong keep its special rights and its autonomy — a deal known as “one country, two systems.”

A big part of that deal was China’s promise that, in 2017, Hong Kong’s citizens would be allowed to democratically elect their top leader for the first time ever. That leader, known as the Hong Kong chief executive, is currently appointed by a pro-Beijing committee. In 2007, the Chinese government reaffirmed its promise to give Hong Kong this right in 2017, which in Hong Kong is referred to as universal suffrage — a sign of how much value people assign to it.

But there have been disturbing signs throughout this year that the central Chinese government might renege on its promise. In July, the Chinese government issued a “white paper” stating that it has “comprehensive jurisdiction” over Hong Kong and that “the high degree of autonomy of [Hong Kong] is not an inherent power, but one that comes solely from the authorization by the central leadership.” It sounded to many like a warning from Beijing that it could dilute or outright revoke Hong Kong’s freedoms, and tens of thousands of Hong Kong’s citizens marched in protest.

Then, in August, Beijing announced its plan for Hong Kong’s 2017 elections. While citizens would be allowed to vote for the chief executive, the candidates for the election would have to be approved by a special committee just like the pro-Beijing committee that currently appoints the chief executive. This lets Beijing hand-pick candidates for the job, which is anti-democratic in itself, but also feels to many in Hong Kong like a first step toward eroding their promised democratic rights.

Full article
Photo 1, 2, 3

stardust-rain:

  • stop comparing Hong Kong to Ferguson JESUS CHRIST STOP. These are two completely different social and political situations fuelled by different forms of oppression and systematic power, you’re not helping one by dismissing the other. 
  • It frustrates the hell out of me that tumblr is US-centric as all fuck, but that’s why it’s why it’s our job to raise awareness and stand in solidarity, not pit these two issues against each other.
  • And to the person who created the whitehouse.gov petition: fuck you and everything you stand for, US involvement and Western imperialism is the last thing that’s needed right now, what is wrong with you. 

while we’re at it, stop saying HK is another Tiananmen Square, that’s sensationalist bullshit and you know it. Tiananmen was perpetuated and accelerated by a whole different set of political and historical contexts and power structures. Over the years it’s been simplified by and watered down by Western media to ‘students vs. central government’ that erases all the issues surrounding it (economical overhaul and reform, international policies that would allow Western imperialism, the recent power-change, the leftover ideology from the last debris of the Cultural Revolution) and the comparison helps. no. one. 

The last thing that helps this is a cause that will be sensationalised to motivate US intervention. 

And white people, stop appropriating the tank man image. I cannot believe I have to spell this shit out for you. 

lati-negros:iwriteaboutfeminism:

Today, Ferguson is prepared to “keep it moving.”

September 28th

In face of the ordinance that mandated protestors not stand still while protesting, the community rode bikes #BlackBrilliance

Late-night.

Late-night.

These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

(via geekyjessica)

Yesssssss.

(via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

Its hard for men to understand why women dont get loud & angry because they havent spent their entire lives being reprimanded whenever they take up too much space. (via pluralfloral)