maryleong:

love-and-radiation:

brittasbaggle:

i’m gonna start saying “i robb stark’d it” whenever i should have listened to my mother but didn’t

"Robb Starking it" can also mean, "Everything I do is so boring nobody wants to watch me do it because my sisters are more interesting."

Robb Stark seriously reminds me of Justin Trudeau.

Such is the strategy playing out right now at the post office. Last December, it was announced that Canada Post would have to phase out home delivery within five years, requiring residential customers to retrieve their mail from nearby community boxes. The change would come along with a significant increase in the cost of postage (from 63 cents to one dollar for a single stamp) and the layoff of 8,000 postal workers.

The announcement was shocking, but calculatedly so. The recommendations were prepared by a think tank arguing for privatization. It claimed that the post office is unsustainable and uncompetitive, a burden to taxpayers, and poor at meeting consumers’ needs. In reality, Canada Post has netted a profit for sixteen of the last seventeen years, and, despite occasionally suffering losses, has yet to receive a single dollar in taxpayer bailout. All of the report’s recommendations were part of a larger and often-used strategy to “restructure” services so that user costs increase while services deteriorate, and then, in response to public frustration, suggest market-based solutions.

What Happend to Canada? — N+1 (x)
nitanahkohe:


I figured enough people could probably use the info, might as well screenshot the question and answer publicly—
the short answer is yes, it is true. 
the long answer is yes, but it’s complicated and happens differently in different places. here’s a short list of some of the problems:
jurisdiction: even after VAWA 2013, all cases of rape, assault, or murder go to the FBI, unless it was intimate partner violence perpetrated on tribal land, by someone who lives or works on the reservation, against an enrolled tribal member whose tribal government has been approved by the US federal government to put the VAWA 2013 tribal jurisdiction stipulations into place. until 2015, that will be only 3 tribes. after 2015, it will apply to all federally-recognized tribes who have the means of updating their codes and enforcing the jurisdiction stipulation (no one is totally sure what that number is, but it’s probably very few, at least at first). obviously Native women on reservations have very little access to the FBI, so most of those cases don’t even get reported, much less prosecuted. non-Native men know this and take full advantage of it. I’ve heard white men bragging in public about how easy it is to rape an Indian girl—“the cops don’t give a fuck and their tribe can’t do shit, you see a pretty Indian girl you like, you grab her and do what you want, it’s no big deal. that’s the reason I fuckin love South Dakota.” this article gives a longer description of jurisdictional issues and some more anecdotal evidence—”It was as though, tribal officers said, their lack of jurisdiction had encouraged a culture of lawlessness. Every officer could recount being told by a non-Indian, “You can’t do anything to me.”…A few months earlier, a young tribal member had been at another bar in New Town when three oil workers offered her a ride home. They drove, instead, to the reservation’s desolate center, raped her, and left her on the road. They returned several times before morning, and each time, they raped her again. ”I don’t think these are isolated incidents,” Cummings told me by phone in October. Since the summer, she had seen several similar cases and had begun to suspect the rapists were repeat offenders.” This report on VAWA 2013, the Tribal Law & Order Act, & violence against Native women also explains some of these jurisdictional issues at greater length. also see: 1, 2, 3.
colonial governments are complicit: this seems pretty self-explanatory, but some great examples of that are how VAWA 2013 didn’t pass for a long time because of those tribal jurisdiction stipulations, and how Canada still refuses to do a national inquiry on missing & murdered indigenous women (even though the UN told them to). see: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.
resources extraction: as the UN recently reported, increased resources extraction nearby or on indigenous territories generally produces large spikes in gender violence against indigenous women. in the US, the place where this is most common is North Dakota, home to the Bakken oil boom; one of the reasons why Natives are opposed to the Keystone XL pipeline is because it’s being slated to be built directly adjacent to several reservations, and the man camps have already been proven to bring sexual violence with them. the man camps are usually havens for substance abuse, rampant sex trafficking and sexual violence, and a general attitude of lawlessness. for more info on this subject: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.  
geographic isolation & language barriers: on some rural reservations, access to law enforcement is pretty much non-existent. for example, in many Alaska Native villages (which, btw, don’t have the small added benefit of VAWA 2013 jurisdiction, bc they’re not legally considered “Indian Country”), women have to live in a small tight-knit community with their assailant(s) with no recourse, because there is no law enforcement. there is literally no one to do a rape kit, and no one to arrest the assailant. some villages only have seasonal access, and can take hours or days to get to. another problem in Alaska is that in some isolated communities, people speak English as a second or third language (if at all)—accessing law enforcement that speaks your Native language is pretty much impossible most of the time. 
trafficking: all the above also create an environment that places Native girls & women at high risk for sex trafficking. non-Native pimps are known to prey on young Native girls on reservations, because they know they often are looking to move to the city but don’t have the means, come from dysfunctional households, and are easy to get hooked on an abusive relationship or substance abuse. in the words of one pimp, “with those young girls, you can promise them heaven and they’ll follow you all the way to hell.” trafficking of Native women is very common interstates throughout the Pacific Northwest, Southwest, and Northern Plains in particular. a major part of the problem is law enforcement—tribal law enforcement face jurisdictional issues, and police have a terrible habit of arresting sex workers, but not pimps and johns, which does not solve the larger issue. moreover, most law enforcement are awful at being able to see the distinction between prostitution and sex trafficking—they’ll arrest a victim of sex trafficking for prostitution, even though they are not the criminal in that situation, and especially when the “prostitute” is Native (because they assume Native women are sex workers, rather than victims of a crime). for more info: 1, 2, 3, 4.
colonial histories of violence & racialized misogyny: this is the one that people are most familiar with—this is where the dialogues on hipster headdresses, sexy Indian princesses, and colonial conquest narratives comes in. for example, the reason pimps prey on Native girls on reservations is not just because they’re easy to entice, but because they make good money off exoticized Pocahontases (literally, considering many of the girls selected are young teenagers). see: 1, 2, 3.
intergenerational trauma, internalized colonialism, & poverty: this is what many chalk sexual & domestic violence coming from within our communities up to. this includes legacies of boarding school abuses, colonial rapes, loss of traditional values that teach against domestic & sexual violence, substance abuse, high unemployment & poverty (creates atmosphere of desperation/hopelessness/depression that can produce violence), etc.
this is, again, a SHORT list. please see the linked resources for more info; there are entire books, pamphlets, films, organizations, communities, and movements that deal with this—it’s hard to sum it up in a few words. these are what i see as the major contributing factors though, and remember, they always work in tandem with one another.

nitanahkohe:

I figured enough people could probably use the info, might as well screenshot the question and answer publicly—

the short answer is yes, it is true. 

the long answer is yes, but it’s complicated and happens differently in different places. here’s a short list of some of the problems:

  • jurisdiction: even after VAWA 2013, all cases of rape, assault, or murder go to the FBI, unless it was intimate partner violence perpetrated on tribal land, by someone who lives or works on the reservation, against an enrolled tribal member whose tribal government has been approved by the US federal government to put the VAWA 2013 tribal jurisdiction stipulations into place. until 2015, that will be only 3 tribes. after 2015, it will apply to all federally-recognized tribes who have the means of updating their codes and enforcing the jurisdiction stipulation (no one is totally sure what that number is, but it’s probably very few, at least at first). obviously Native women on reservations have very little access to the FBI, so most of those cases don’t even get reported, much less prosecuted. non-Native men know this and take full advantage of it. I’ve heard white men bragging in public about how easy it is to rape an Indian girl—“the cops don’t give a fuck and their tribe can’t do shit, you see a pretty Indian girl you like, you grab her and do what you want, it’s no big deal. that’s the reason I fuckin love South Dakota.” this article gives a longer description of jurisdictional issues and some more anecdotal evidence—”It was as though, tribal officers said, their lack of jurisdiction had encouraged a culture of lawlessness. Every officer could recount being told by a non-Indian, “You can’t do anything to me.”…A few months earlier, a young tribal member had been at another bar in New Town when three oil workers offered her a ride home. They drove, instead, to the reservation’s desolate center, raped her, and left her on the road. They returned several times before morning, and each time, they raped her again. ”I don’t think these are isolated incidents,” Cummings told me by phone in October. Since the summer, she had seen several similar cases and had begun to suspect the rapists were repeat offenders.” This report on VAWA 2013, the Tribal Law & Order Act, & violence against Native women also explains some of these jurisdictional issues at greater length. also see: 1, 2, 3.
  • colonial governments are complicit: this seems pretty self-explanatory, but some great examples of that are how VAWA 2013 didn’t pass for a long time because of those tribal jurisdiction stipulations, and how Canada still refuses to do a national inquiry on missing & murdered indigenous women (even though the UN told them to). see: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.
  • resources extraction: as the UN recently reported, increased resources extraction nearby or on indigenous territories generally produces large spikes in gender violence against indigenous women. in the US, the place where this is most common is North Dakota, home to the Bakken oil boom; one of the reasons why Natives are opposed to the Keystone XL pipeline is because it’s being slated to be built directly adjacent to several reservations, and the man camps have already been proven to bring sexual violence with them. the man camps are usually havens for substance abuse, rampant sex trafficking and sexual violence, and a general attitude of lawlessness. for more info on this subject: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.  
  • geographic isolation & language barriers: on some rural reservations, access to law enforcement is pretty much non-existent. for example, in many Alaska Native villages (which, btw, don’t have the small added benefit of VAWA 2013 jurisdiction, bc they’re not legally considered “Indian Country”), women have to live in a small tight-knit community with their assailant(s) with no recourse, because there is no law enforcement. there is literally no one to do a rape kit, and no one to arrest the assailant. some villages only have seasonal access, and can take hours or days to get to. another problem in Alaska is that in some isolated communities, people speak English as a second or third language (if at all)—accessing law enforcement that speaks your Native language is pretty much impossible most of the time. 
  • trafficking: all the above also create an environment that places Native girls & women at high risk for sex trafficking. non-Native pimps are known to prey on young Native girls on reservations, because they know they often are looking to move to the city but don’t have the means, come from dysfunctional households, and are easy to get hooked on an abusive relationship or substance abuse. in the words of one pimp, “with those young girls, you can promise them heaven and they’ll follow you all the way to hell.” trafficking of Native women is very common interstates throughout the Pacific Northwest, Southwest, and Northern Plains in particular. a major part of the problem is law enforcement—tribal law enforcement face jurisdictional issues, and police have a terrible habit of arresting sex workers, but not pimps and johns, which does not solve the larger issue. moreover, most law enforcement are awful at being able to see the distinction between prostitution and sex trafficking—they’ll arrest a victim of sex trafficking for prostitution, even though they are not the criminal in that situation, and especially when the “prostitute” is Native (because they assume Native women are sex workers, rather than victims of a crime). for more info: 1, 2, 3, 4.
  • colonial histories of violence & racialized misogyny: this is the one that people are most familiar with—this is where the dialogues on hipster headdresses, sexy Indian princesses, and colonial conquest narratives comes in. for example, the reason pimps prey on Native girls on reservations is not just because they’re easy to entice, but because they make good money off exoticized Pocahontases (literally, considering many of the girls selected are young teenagers). see: 1, 2, 3.
  • intergenerational trauma, internalized colonialism, & poverty: this is what many chalk sexual & domestic violence coming from within our communities up to. this includes legacies of boarding school abuses, colonial rapes, loss of traditional values that teach against domestic & sexual violence, substance abuse, high unemployment & poverty (creates atmosphere of desperation/hopelessness/depression that can produce violence), etc.

this is, again, a SHORT list. please see the linked resources for more info; there are entire books, pamphlets, films, organizations, communities, and movements that deal with this—it’s hard to sum it up in a few words. these are what i see as the major contributing factors though, and remember, they always work in tandem with one another.

apersnicketylemon:

So in case people are wondering in Canada poking holes in condoms or otherwise tampering with birth control has now been classified as sexual assault because it coerces the conditions by which consent is obtained.

A man in Nova Scotia poked holes in the condoms hoping to get his girlfriend pregnant so she would be forced to stay with him. She did become pregnant and had an abortion and filed charges. The supreme court of Canada upheld the ruling today unanimously. This is a big step forward to helping get rid of rape culture.

This has surely got to be a joke? (x)

This has surely got to be a joke? (x)

Many people do not believe in NCR [not criminally responsible]. In other words, they don’t believe in such a designation. They believe that if you kill somebody like Tim McLean, the way that Vince Li did, that it was a criminal act and that you are criminally responsible. They don’t believe in the designation NCR because of a mental disorder. That perpetuates stigma, so it buys into people’s fears and their own social prejudice. It confirms their stigmas that they’ve seen on television or Hollywood movies, because most people portrayed as mentally ill in Hollywood movies, or even children’s cartoons, are portrayed as being violent and untreatable. People watch television and it simply confirms to them that these people are looney tunes, crazy psychos who do not recover.

On [CBC’s] Cracked, for example, you will only see one side of the picture. Oftentimes they show a sick person when they’re sickest, but they hardly ever show when a person is well.

Chris Summerville of the Schizophrenia Society of Canada on the partway release of Vince Li, who killed Tim McLean on a Greyhound bus (x)